Year 5 & 6 Homework

Friday 29 November 2019

Posted on Friday 29 November 2019 by Mr Catherall

Friday 22 November 2019

This week, our homework is Practice Makes Perfect: I can name the countries of the British Isles and their capital cities. Linked to our Where in the World geography topic, this homework is all about learning, and remembering, a few important facts. Children should use the table below to learn the countries and their capital cities in preparation for our homework review by Thursday 05 December 2019.  

 

country capital city
England London
Scotland Edinburgh
Wales Cardiff
Northern Ireland Belfast
Republic of Ireland Dublin

Times tables

This week, we will focus on the 12x table. Children should be ready for a test on Friday 06 December 2019. Here are a few examples of the kinds of questions children could be asked and the type of questions children could be practising in addition to the times table facts:

9 x 120 =

______ = 1200 x 30

1.2 x 6 =

 

72 ÷ 12 =

4800 ÷ 12 =

_______ = 8.4 ÷ 12

 

 

Friday 22 November 2019

Posted on Friday 22 November 2019 by Mr Catherall

This week, we will be focussing on words ending in the suffixes –ible or –able. As a general rule, although there are some exceptions which we’ll explore in our spelling sessions, we add –able when you are able to do it eg. breakable means you are able to break it. When there is no clear root word, we add –ible. This week, we’d like children to practise spelling the words below in preparation for a test on Friday 29 November 2019.

invincible legible incredible
forgivable reliable enjoyable
valuable breakable  

Friday 22 November 2019

Posted on Friday 22 November 2019 by Mr Catherall

This week, the whole school has the same Talk Time homework: Which charity should our school support?

Next week, a charity will be decided for us to support for the year ahead – for example, when we have a performance, we’ll collect money for this particular charity. What charity does your child think we should support?

You could talk about:

  • what a charity is
  • why charities are important
  • what sort of work they do
  • charities that have meaning to your family, to school or the community
  • national and international charities and their work

Next week, each class will vote (because in our school we make democratic decisions) for the charity they would like to support to form a shortlist. Then, our recently elected School Council will decide which charity we will support for the next year.

Friday 15 November 2019

Posted on Friday 15 November 2019 by Mr Catherall

Friday 15 November 2019

This week, the whole school has the same Creative homework which children should be ready to discuss as part of our homework review on Thursday 21 November.

I know how to STOP bullying.

This homework is a response to our learning this week during anti-bullying week. Throughout the week, each class has had the chance to talk about what bullying is, what the different types of bullying are and how we can STOP it:

  • Start
  • Telling
  • Other
  • People

As part of your discussion you may find our school definition of bullying useful, as agreed by our School Councillors:

Bullying is when you hurt someone, physically or emotionally, several times opurpose.

As the homework is Creative, you can do anything you want to respond to the statement. Here are a few ideas to help you:

  • Create a cartoon strip of a bullying scenario and how it is solved.
  • Create an acrostic poem using the word bullying.
  • Write your own ‘kindness statements’ for your class.
  • Create a scenarios quiz for your class to decide what they would do.

Friday 08 November 2019

Posted on Monday 11 November 2019 by Mr Catherall

Friday 08 November 2019

This week, our homework is Practice Makes Perfect: I can use expanded noun phrase.

In our recent writing lessons, we’ve been learning loads about expanded noun phrases and how to use them. An expanded noun phrase gives more detail or information about a noun. An expanded noun phrase has a determiner (like ‘his’), an adjective (like ‘green’) and a noun (like ‘eyes) – his green eyes. In the sentence below, the expanded noun phrase is underlined.

The angry, little elf stomped furiously out onto the ice.

For their homework, children should practice using the adjectives below (and their own ideas) to create their own expanded noun phrases.

isolated determined blazing hideous menacing
reckless rippling trembling deafening crisp

 

This homework should be completed and returned by Thursday 14 November.

Friday 18 October 2019

Posted on Thursday 17 October 2019 by Mr Catherall

This week, our homework is Practice Makes Perfect: I can use brackets to show parenthesis.

Recently, during our writing lessons, we’ve been learning to use brackets to show parenthesis. Parenthesis (shown by using brackets, dashes and commas) is extra information that is not essential for the sentence to make sense.

For example, if I was writing, ‘I went to the cinema last night to see a scary film.’

I could add extra information at the end and use brackets to show this.

I went to the cinema last night to see a scary film (Scary Film 3: The Return of the Scare Factor).

The name of the film is not needed but the parenthesis adds extra information.

For their homework this week, children should complete the worksheet they’ve been given – they should be able to do this on their own – by Thursday 24 October 2019.

worksheet:

Add brackets to the sentences below:

  1. Ellie my older sister lives in Manchester.
  2. Jupiter the largest planet is made of gas.
  3. The twins Ben and Billy have just played their first football match.
  4. The ambulance which had sirens blaring and lights flashing moved swiftly through the traffic.
  5. The student who was new to the school got lost to her first lesson.

Rewrite these sentences adding extra information to the main clause – use brackets to show parenthesis.

  1. The monstrous boy howled in the corridor.
  2. They walked down the corridor.
  3. Edward V. Vinctus was an interesting man.

Times Tables

This week, we will continue to focus on the 7x table. Children should be ready for a test on Thursday  24 October 2019. Here are a few examples of the kinds of questions children could be asked and the type of questions children could be practising in addition to the times table facts:

8 x 7000 =

______ = 700 x 20

0.7 x 60 =

 

56 ÷ 7 =

7700 ÷ 7 =

_______ = 3.5 ÷ 7

How many sides would there be on…

9 heptagons?

90 heptagons?

900 heptagons?

Friday 11 October 2019

Posted on Friday 11 October 2019 by Mr Catherall

Friday 11 October 2019

This week, the whole school has the same Talk Time homework. In preparation for the upcoming School Council elections, children should complete one of the following tasks:

  • I can prepare a speech (School Council elections).
  • I know the importance of voting.

It’s time for children to consider if they would like to stand for election for our new School Council.  With two representatives from each class chosen democratically by their peers, all children are encouraged to take an active part in pupil voice.

Elections for our new school council will take place on Thursday 24 October with our polling station and ballot boxes at the ready.  Candidates will have the opportunity to give their election speech in class to their peers.

What makes a good school councillor has been considered by our current school council.

  • ‘use all the 8 Rs for learning’
  • ‘be respectful’
  • ‘help others’
  • ‘be a good speaker and listener (to members of your class and in the meetings)’
  • ‘tell the truth’
  • ‘be confident with your ideas’
  • ‘accept the views of others even if you don’t agree’
  • ‘be friendly and approachable’
  • ‘make good choices in class and around school’

Hints for your speech include:

  • What skills and abilities would a good school councillor have?
  • What are you particularly good at that would help you to be a great school councillor?
  • What do you think would make the school better?
  • What could you do that people would really like?
  • Think of things that are realistic, maybe that you could do yourself, rather than having to ask other people to do.

Thank you to our current school councillors for all their ideas and contributions.  We hope you have enjoyed this role and responsibility.  You’re welcome to stand again for election.

Good luck to all children who decide to stand in the elections.

If you choose not to stand in the election, you should instead consider the importance of voting.

Friday 04 October 2019

Posted on Friday 04 October 2019 by Mr Catherall

This week, our homework is Talk Time: Should children be encouraged to take part in eSports.

Recently, two British teenagers we incredibly successful at an e Sports Gaming World Cup – a sixteen year old won £2.6 million. The enormous prize money has made some people question whether children should be encouraged to get involved in eSports.

The prize money earnt at the competition raised a few issues: whether rewarding children with enormous cash sums is right; the fact that, to be a world champion at eSports, you have to spend a lot of time practising – time spent sitting still, not doing physical exercise; the definition of sport, and whether eSports is a real sport.

However, one thing we know for sure is that eSports is becoming hugely popular worldwide. It now has a regular audience of around 300 million people. In total, fans spend 6.6 billion hours a year watching eSports – up from 1.3 billion hours in 2012. There’s big money in it, too. It is predicted that eSports will generate £1 billion worldwide by 2020, thanks to sponsorship, advertising and broadcast deals. But the eSports audience is quite narrow. Industry experts reckon that around 60% of American eSports viewers are young, aged 18-34. Traditional sports, such as football or rugby, tend to have a much wider age range of fans. The International Olympic Committee has already met to discuss introducing eSports to the Olympics. They decided against doing it for now but have not ruled it out for the future.

Is eSports a positive, sociable, fun activity that kids should be encouraged to get involved in?

Or, do they do more harm than good for youngsters?

Children should discuss this question at home with an adult and be ready to debate this during our homework review by Thursday 09 October 2019.

Friday 27 September 2019

Posted on Friday 27 September 2019 by Mr Catherall

This week, the whole school has the same Creative homework: I can see maths all around me.

Maths is all around us. But, how often do we appreciate this? This homework is all about spotting maths in our everyday lives and we’re exposed to it more than we realise sometimes. We’d like to children to find some examples of maths from their everyday lives and show these creatively. There are many examples of maths in the world around us but here are a few examples:

  • travel, TV or film timetables
  • measuring ingredients
  • finding examples of shapes in buildings
  • counting out objects
  • spending money when shopping
  • distances on road signs
  • %s in sales
  • cutting food into the correct amount of slices or pieces

Children should be ready to celebrate their learning in our weekly homework review in class by Thursday 03 October 2019.

Please note: this homework should take no longer than 30 minutes.

Friday 20 September 2019

Posted on Friday 20 September 2019 by Mr Catherall

This week, our homework is Practice Makes Perfect: I can start sentences in different ways.

In our recent writing lessons, we’ve been focussing on starting our sentences in different ways. We found some examples in different texts, practised starting sentences in different ways and then applied our learning when writing a setting description based on our class novel: The Nowhere Emporium. For their homework, we would like children to continue their learning by practising writing some sentences that start in different ways. This image shows the learning prompt we’ve been using in school and should help when completing the task.

For a challenge, create a short piece of descriptive writing where the sentence starters are varied. This homework will be reviewed as part of our weekly homework review in class and should be completed by Thursday 26 September.

Please remember, this homework should take no longer than 30 minutes.

Times Tables

This week, we will focus on the 4x tables. See the example in your homework book as an example of the kinds of questions asked during our times table test. Children will be tested on Friday 27 September 2019.