Year 3 & 4 Spelling

3 February 2023

Posted on Tuesday 07 February 2023 by Mrs Paterson

Our spellings for the final week of the half term are all homophones: words that sound the same but that have different spellings and meanings. Practise the following for a test on Friday 10th February:

there       their      they’re     here     hear     which     witch     two     to     too     where     wear     were

 

27 January 2023

Posted on Friday 27 January 2023 by Mrs McCormick

busy

strange

ordinary

particular

continue

accident

complete

surprising

occasional

probable

possible

20 January 2023

Posted on Thursday 19 January 2023 by Mrs Paterson

This week we have been looking at what happens when we add the prefixes -un and -dis to root words. Adding a prefix changes the meaning of the word.

Practise the following spellings in preparation for a test on Friday 27th January.

unkind      unfriendly      uncertain      unclear      discontinue      disappear      disbelief      disadvantage

For some creative ideas on how to make learning spellings more fun, check out our super spelling strategies guide.

16 January 2023

Posted on Monday 16 January 2023 by Mrs Paterson

In Week 2, we looked at different spellings for the “ie” sound.

Please practise the following words in preparation for a test on Friday 29th January.

bicycle    decide    describe     exercise     guide     height     surprise     replied     applied     why     slide     cried

For some creative ideas on how to make learning spellings more fun, check out our super spelling strategies guide.

9 December 2022

Posted on Friday 09 December 2022 by Mrs Paterson

For your spellings this week, we would like you to practise some of the Year 3/4 common exception words:

appear         arrive        believe      build        decide       different        enough       experience

25 November 2022

Posted on Thursday 24 November 2022 by Mrs Paterson

This week we’ve been looking at the rules for when we add -er or -est to a root word. For example, where there is a y, change it to an i when you add the suffix. Where there is a short vowel sound such as in hot, double up on the consonant: hot -> hotter.

Practise adding the two suffixes to the following root words:

nice     late     rude     brave     happy     funny     hot     write     tall     ripe

For some creative ideas on how to make learning spellings more fun, check out our super spelling strategies guide.

18 November 2022

Posted on Wednesday 23 November 2022 by Mr Catherall

This week, we’ve been learning about homophones.

Homophones are words that sound the same but have different meanings and different spellings. This makes them hard to spell correctly when we’re writing.

This week, practise spelling these homophones. The best way to do this is to practise using them in sentences – think about your handwriting, too!

which

witch

wear

where

we’re

11 November 2022

Posted on Thursday 10 November 2022 by Mrs Paterson

This week we’ve been looking at words that have the “ue” phoneme (sound). There are a few different graphemes (letters) that represent this: ue, u, ew and u-e for example.

continue         peculiar           particular          queue           knew

rescue           amuse           venue           issue          conclude

For some creative ideas on how to make learning spellings more fun, check out our super spelling strategies guide.

14 October 2022

Posted on Friday 14 October 2022 by Mrs Paterson

This week we’ve been looking at what happens when we add the suffixes “ed” and “ing” to our root words.

If there’s no “e” on the end of the root word then there’s nothing we need to do, we just add our suffix.

For example: call + ed -> called, call + ing -> calling

However, if there’s an “e” on the end of the root word, the suffix “ed” or “ing” replaces it.

For example: smile + ed -> smiled (not smileed!), smile + ing -> smiling.

(The exception is be + ing -> being).

Practise adding “ed” and “ing” to these words in preparation for a spelling test on Friday 21.10.22.

arrive   notice   surprise   suppose   learn   smile   call   live

For some creative ideas on how to make learning spellings more fun, check out our super spelling strategies guide on the website.

30 September 2022

Posted on Friday 30 September 2022 by Mr Catherall

This week, we’ve been learning one of our three key spelling rules: double up for a short vowel sound. There are many generalisations in the English language and this is one of them. But, we believe it’s one of the most important – there are, of course, some exceptions. The double up for a short vowel sound rule means that when there is a short vowel sound (a, e, i, o, u) in a word we double up the consonant after it. For example, in the word ‘accident’ the ‘a’ is a short ‘ay’ sound so the consonant after it (c) is doubled up – a CC ident.

Practise spelling these words at home in preparation for our spelling test on Friday 07.10.22.

accident         address         appear         arrive         different         difficult         possible         opposite

For some creative ideas on how to make learning spellings more fun, check out our super spelling strategies guide on the website.