News

Latest news from around the school

Annual survey results summary, 2019

Posted on 28 August 2019 by Mr Roundtree

Every year, we invite you to complete the annual survey of parents and carers. Thank you to the 79 people who completed the 2019 survey.

The agree/disagree statements were closely based on those that Ofsted use for their Parent View. This gives you the chance to tell Ofsted what you think about your child’s school, from the quality of teaching to dealing with bullying and poor behaviour.

We also asked whether you’d recommend the school and invited comments about what you like and what we could improve on.

We’re delighted that the statements prompted very positive responses. Particularly positive responses can be seen for important statements which earned 100% agreement (My child is happy at Scholes (Elmet) Primary School and My child feels safe at this school) and one which earned 99% (My child is well looked after). Also very positive was that 96% of parents would recommend us to others.

The statements, with one or two typical comments, are:

  1. My child is happy at Scholes (Elmet) Primary School. (‘Both children go to school happily every day and speak fondly of their teachers and everything they do in class’ and ‘The fact that my child is happy to go to school in the mornings and seems happy at pick up strongly suggests they are.’)
  2. My child feels safe at this school. (‘[My daughter] feels very safe and understands the rules.’)
  3. My child makes good progress at this school. (‘[My son] has made massive progress in the short time he has been at Scholes.’ and ‘Making great academic progress. Very pleased with the teaching.’)
  4. My child is well looked after. (There were only three comments here, and they relate to specific concerns regarding children eating/drinking – we’ll look into these.)
  5. My child is taught well at Scholes (Elmet) Primary School. (‘Mr Catherall is a fantastic teacher.’)
  6. Adults in school make sure pupils are well behaved. (‘Pupils are invariably polite and courteous towards visitors’ and ‘Never get to see them during school hours so no idea. The children I see outside school hours all seem polite and well mannered.’)
  7. Scholes (Elmet) Primary School deals effectively with bullying. (56% agreed with this statement: ‘We were really pleased with how Mrs Hague addressed the friendship group issues that arose.’ Many people (41%) responded by saying they don’t know: ‘Luckily, we’ve never experienced bullying.’)
  8. The school is well led and managed. (‘I have no direct involvement but there seems to have been a lot of positive changes made in the last couple of years.’ and ‘Miss Hague is fab and could not be more helpful.’)
  9. The school responds well to any concerns I raise. (‘All queries are dealt with fairly and efficiently.’ and ‘I have not raised any concerns so far but any questions I have had have been answered promptly, openly and well.’)
  10. I receive useful information from the school about my child’s progress. (‘The reports are great to see. Keeps us up to speed of my child attainment and can then raise concerns by seeing the teacher or headteacher if required.’)

Tell us something you like about the school.

48 comments received, some of which relate to very specific reasons, but typical comments include praise for our teachers and other staff, the swimming pool and the friendly atmosphere. ‘Scholes (Elmet) Primary School is a fantastic school with a strong team of enthusiastic teachers that try their very best to make learning as fun as possible’; ‘My child likes his teacher and his happy to go each day to school’; and ‘My child does enjoy more of a active way of learning and I feel like Scholes have a good mixture of this’ are typical comments which we appreciate greatly!

Any reference here or throughout the survey to particular teachers will be passed on to teachers, who welcome the feedback as part of their commitment to performance improvement.

Tell us something the school could improve on.

35 comments received, although many of these are actually neutral or even positive comments like ‘Nothing really’ and ‘I am happy with all areas at the moment.’

As in previous years, the majority of comments reflect conflicting viewpoints, especially in relation to homework: some want more, some want less; some don’t like the creative homework, some don’t like the whole-school homework tasks… The conclusion, as in previous years, is that we can’t please everyone all the time about an issue like homework, but we will keep reviewing this. One other common issue that was raised relates to school dinners – we’ll pass on this feedback to our caterers.

The survey results and the comments will be passed to Miss Hague, as Head of School, who will review the feedback alongside me, as Head of Federation, in order to identify up to three key actions that we will do. Miss Hague will also feed back to staff any particular concerns that were raised as well as – far more common – make sure staff are aware of the praise they’ve earned.

There's still time to enter...

Posted on 22 August 2019 by Mr Roundtree

…our 2019 Summer Competition!

Scholes (Elmet) Primary is a happy and healthy place to learn – and we want your child to celebrate this by creating the words ‘happy’ (for children up to Year 2) or ‘healthy’ (for children in Year 3 to Year 6) from letters that your child spots in the environment.

Here’s an example of a letter ‘h’ which we’ve found on the internet – somewhere in their surroundings, can your child find the five letters that spell ‘happy’ or the seven letters that spell ‘healthy’?

We found the example above on the internet, but it would be even better if your child were to take pics from real life – perhaps they could find all the images on one day out, or perhaps they set themselves a target of finding one letter every week of the holidays. Your child could spot ‘letters’ near their home or on holiday. They could make the letter shapes from their own body, stretched into different positions, or they could even ask different family members to create the shapes!

There will be four prizes of £15 book tokens – two for the best ‘happy’ words and two for the best ‘healthy’ words.

Please paste the words into a Word document – one side of A4 – and email to school ([email protected]) by Friday 06 September 2019.

Good luck!

Has your child been looking out for letters that spell 'happy' or 'healthy'?

Posted on 12 August 2019 by Mr Roundtree

Scholes (Elmet) Primary is a happy and healthy place to learn – and we want your child to celebrate this by creating the words ‘happy’ (for children up to Year 2) or ‘healthy’ (for children in Year 3 to Year 6) from letters that your child spots in the environment.

Here’s an example of a letter ‘h’ which we’ve found on the internet – somewhere in their surroundings, can your child find the five letters that spell ‘happy’ or the seven letters that spell ‘healthy’?

We found the example above on the internet, but it would be even better if your child were to take pics from real life – perhaps they could find all the images on one day out, or perhaps they set themselves a target of finding one letter every week of the holidays. Your child could spot ‘letters’ near their home or on holiday. They could make the letter shapes from their own body, stretched into different positions, or they could even ask different family members to create the shapes!

There will be four prizes of £15 book tokens – two for the best ‘happy’ words and two for the best ‘healthy’ words.

Please paste the words into a Word document – one side of A4 – and email to school ([email protected]) by Friday 06 September 2019.

Good luck!

Having a happy and healthy summer!

Posted on 12 August 2019 by Mr Roundtree

There’s a lot happening over the summer in and around Leeds. Check out this menu of activities set up by the Child Friendly Leeds team and some dates for Breeze on tour.

Whatever you and your child are up to this summer, we all hope you’re having a happy and healthy one!

Is your child staying safe over the summer?

Posted on 12 August 2019 by Mr Roundtree

Here’s a reminder of five top articles from Thinkuknow to support you at home…

1. Gaming: what parents and carers need to know

Many children will be spending time gaming online over the summer holidays. This article explores the different elements of gaming with a particular focus on how it can be used by offenders, but focusing on what parents can do to support their child while gaming.

2. Sharing pictures of your child online

Lots of parents love sharing photos of their children with friends and family, particularly when they are on holiday or starting the new school year. A recent report found that 42% of young people reported that their parents had done this without asking their permission. This article helps parents to protect their child while staying social.

3. Keeping your under 5s safe online

Whether it’s watching videos, playing games on their devices or talking to Alexa – today’s under 5s are spending more time online. In this article, the Thinkuknow team look at the benefits of children accessing the internet, and share advice about how parents can make sure their child has a safe experience online.

4. Live streaming: responding to the risks

Many children enjoy live streaming as it can be used to showcase talent, develop communication skills and create identity. This article helps parents to understand why children love it, what the risks can be, and how they can help their child stay safe if they are live streaming.

5. Using parental controls

Parental controls are a great tool for helping to protect children but should not replace open and honest conversations with children about their life online. Share these tips on how to use parental controls effectively.

Happy and Healthy Summer competition

Posted on 30 July 2019 by Mr Roundtree

Each year, we invite children to enter a competition – last year, we enjoyed reading lots of postcards from around Yorkshire, the UK and the world.

This year, we’d like your child to get creative with a camera! We want our school to be a happy and healthy place to learn – and we want your child to celebrate this by creating the words ‘happy’ (for children up to Year 2) or ‘healthy’ (for children in Year 3 to Year 6) from letters that your child spots in the environment.

Here’s an example of a letter ‘h’ which we’ve found on the internet – somewhere in their surroundings, can your child find the five letters that spell ‘happy’ or the seven letters that spell ‘healthy’?

We found the example above on the internet, but it would be even better if your child were to take pics from real life – perhaps they could find all the images on one day out, or perhaps they set themselves a target of finding one letter every week of the holidays. Your child could spot ‘letters’ near their home or on holiday. They could make the letter shapes from their own body, stretched into different positions, or they could even ask different family members to create the shapes!

There will be four prizes of £15 book tokens – two for the best ‘happy’ words and two for the best ‘healthy’ words.

Please paste the words into a Word document – one side of A4 – and email to school ([email protected]) by Friday 06 September 2019.

Good luck!

Living and Learning : I can illustrate happy and healthy choices.

Posted on 12 July 2019 by Mrs Latham

Our whole school homework produced some super examples, including songs, posters, games, a cow (to show a lactose intolerance) and lots of discussions. Children illustrated how they make healthy choices about food, exercise and sleep.

Here comes the summer...

Posted on 10 July 2019 by Mr Roundtree

There are lots happening over the summer in and around Leeds. Check out this menu of activities set up by the Child Friendly Leeds team and some dates for Breeze on tour.

Whatever you and your child gets up to this summer, have a happy and healthy one!

Staying safe over the summer

Posted on 10 July 2019 by Mr Roundtree

Is your child staying safe over the summer? Here are five top articles from Thinkuknow to support you at home…

1. Gaming: what parents and carers need to know

Many children will be spending time gaming online over the summer holidays. This article explores the different elements of gaming with a particular focus on how it can be used by offenders, but focusing on what parents can do to support their child while gaming.

2. Sharing pictures of your child online

Lots of parents love sharing photos of their children with friends and family, particularly when they are on holiday or starting the new school year. A recent report found that 42% of young people reported that their parents had done this without asking their permission. This article helps parents to protect their child while staying social.

3. Keeping your under 5s safe online

Whether it’s watching videos, playing games on their devices or talking to Alexa – today’s under 5s are spending more time online. In this article, the Thinkuknow team look at the benefits of children accessing the internet, and share advice about how parents can make sure their child has a safe experience online.

4. Live streaming: responding to the risks

Many children enjoy live streaming as it can be used to showcase talent, develop communication skills and create identity. This article helps parents to understand why children love it, what the risks can be, and how they can help their child stay safe if they are live streaming.

5. Using parental controls

Parental controls are a great tool for helping to protect children but should not replace open and honest conversations with children about their life online. Share these tips on how to use parental controls effectively.

Is your child attending any holiday club?

Posted on 08 July 2019 by Mr Roundtree

With the summer holidays fast approaching, some of you may be booking your child into summer camps, activity days and child-care settings.

Last year, the government consulted on a voluntary safeguarding code for out-of-school settings. In addition to the code for providers, the DfE published draft guidance for parents, in the form of ‘Safeguarding questions for parents and carers (DfE, 2018)’.

So you can be confident about asking appropriate questions of the people you intend to leave your children with, some of the questions you could ask include:

  • Have staff and volunteers undertaken DBS checks? How recent were
    the checks?
  • Will any adults besides the instructor be present at the venue while my child is there? If so, will they be there on a regular basis?
  • What training have staff had?
  • May I have a copy of your child protection policy?
  • Who is your designated safeguarding lead (DSL) and what training
    have they had? How recent was this training?
  • My child has Special Educational Needs and / or a disability (SEND). What steps will you take to accommodate this?
  • My child needs help with: using the toilet; changing; feeding; their medication, etc. How will these personal care needs be addressed?
  • How are you securely storing the information you hold on my child? Who has access to it and are you giving it to anyone else?
  • Is my child allowed to access the internet unsupervised?
  • Do you have filtering and monitoring systems in place? What are they?

In addition to the questions to ask, the draft guidance for parents sets out some ‘red flags’ that might prompt you to consider looking for an alternative setting. The red flags are:

  • Staff are not DBS checked
  • No child protection policy
  • Signs of abuse on other children who attend the setting, for example, unexplained bruises
  • Provider unable to name a designated safeguarding lead
  • The designated safeguarding lead has not had relevant training
  • If the provision allows children access to the internet, no filtering or monitoring systems in place
  • Dangerous physical environment e.g. loose wires, damp, no fire escape, no first aid kit
  • No designated first aider
  • No parental consent form or requirement for emergency contact details
  • Other adults coming into the out-of-school setting who are not staff members / a lack of clarity on the roles of different adults in the setting
  • No health and safety policy
  • No fire escape plan